Category Archives: Chatsworth

Our favourite five Easter Egg Hunts

According to the Christian Bible Good Friday is the day that Christ died on the cross. Jesus then resurrected and came back to life on Easter Sunday, which is why Christians celebrate Easter and the birth of newlife.

Whist prayer and worship are very important to the Christian faith at this time, there are some modern traditions that have become universally popular, including Easter egg hunts, The Easter bunny and David’s favourite food, chocolate!

Why chocolate eggs at Easter?

For most of us Easter isn’t Easter without chocolate eggs! How did this tradition start? In years gone by church leaders forbade the eating of eggs during Holy week leading up to Easter.This meant that any eggs laid during the week were saved and decorated to make them “Holy Week eggs”. These were then given to children as gifts, and so the tradition of Easter eggs began.

Chicken hunting for chocolate eggs

Lucky has already started her Easter Egg Hunt!

easter eggsThe Victorians embellished the tradition creating satin-covered cardboard eggs filled with Easter gifts. Then as chocolate became more affordable and available the cardboards eggs were replaced by tasty chocolate eggs.

I wonder how many chocolate Easter eggs are made today? Cadbury’s alone produce over 50 million Easter eggs per year.

The chocolate Easter bunny is also very popular!

Our favourite five Easter egg hunts:
  1. Hop to it at Chatsworth House, the home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire.  There is an ‘egg’citing Easter trail with willow and wicker animals hidden throughout the gardens. Luckily there is a free explorer’s map to help you find them. Join in the Easter themed activities including face painting, musical entertainment, crafts, Easter bunny trailer rides and Easter egg hunts.
  2. If you thought dinosaur eggs only existed in Jurassic Park, you’d be wrong! You might find some at the Heights of Abraham along the prehistoric themed trail. With lots of dinosaur themed activities to entertain the children and a panoramic view from the cable car you’ll all enjoy a fun day out.
  3. Dinosaurs seem to be popular in the Peak District this Easter. You can meet Tricksy the Dinosaur, the UK’s first female animatronic T-Rex at Matlock Farm Park on Easter Monday. At an incredible 6ft tall and over 10ft long, Tricksy the Dinosaur blinks, roars and walks like a real dinosaur.
  4. Join in the Great Egg Hunt at Cromford Mill and not only might you find an egg or two, but you will discover how Arkwright’s Mill, often called the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution, changed the world we live in today. Plenty of ‘egg’citing Easter  activities for all the family, including The Great Egg Hunt, an Owl and Bird Display, family crafts, live music, and the popular Arkwright Artisan Market.
  5. Haddon Hall is often described as ‘the most perfect manor house to survive from the Middle Ages’. Home to the Manners family, the Manor abounds with original features including the medieval kitchens, a banqueting hall, and a 17th century long gallery often used in blockbuster films such as Mary Queen of Scots. You may find the Easter bunny too!
Get up lazy bones

Here on the farm Easter is a busy but wonderful time of year. Our suckler herd of cows are having calves and the new baby lambs are gamboling in the fields. But the most important thing is that the Easter Bunny leaves David some chocolate eggs on Sunday!

Felicity 

Take a tour of the Peak District

Why not take a tour of our stunning Peak District countryside?

One of the best ways to explore our special Peak District is to get out and about on the country lanes. To make life easy we have been working with Ashbourne Community Transport to put together some mini bus tours of Derbyshire, including places of interest.

Instead of driving you can have a complete break, relax back, enjoy the view, and let someone else do the hard work for you!

Derbyshire Connect Bus

Mini bus tours

The Derbyshire Connect minibus can seat up to 16 people, has a wheelchair access tail lift and is spacious. The cost is extremely reasonable and includes the driver with local knowledge of the area. One of our favourite routes is the Southern villages, and moorlands, which includes short breaks at Tissington, Ilam, Butterton, Ecton and a two hour stop over in Buxton.

Monsal Head Peak District

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other themed excursions include Denstone Farm Shop and Churnet Valley Railway, Dambusters tour and Castleton, Chatsworth House, Crich Tramway Village, Peak Rail and Cromford Trust, and Thornbridge Brewery and Bakewell. There are so many exciting places to visit that you could stay at Hoe Grange for a month and still not see everything!

Prices

The bus will pick you up directly from your cabin and prices range from £57 up to £143 – extremely reasonable, even if you don’t fill all the seats!

How to book

It’s quick and simple to book too, just call the booking line 01335 300670 to discuss the various options, where you would like to go and when, or e-mail info@ashbournect.org.uk.

Chatsworth house

We hope we have inspired you to explore a little further afield – you will be surprised how varied the landscape of the Peak District is from North to South!

Felicity 

Things to do this Easter in the Peak District

The Peak District is the perfect location for some family fun this Easter. Whether you’re staying in the Peak District for the week and using Hoe Grange as a central base, or simply in need of the perfect family day out.

With so much on offer for the whole family, you’ll be torn between the fantastic events that are taking place across Derbyshire.We’ve also included our top recommendations for those who require accessible activities.

Carsington Water

Boma at Carsington

As the weather starts to brighten-up why not dive into your adventurous side at Carsington Water? There is a wide range of outdoor activities, and everyone can get in on the action. Why not get out on the water with Sailability on one of the accessible sailing dinghies? 

Take part in the Kayaking or windsurfing taster over the bank holiday weekend or hire a bike from just £11 for two hours and make the most of their excellent cycle routes, accessible bikes are available too. Book in advance to avoid disappointment.  

See our favourite cycle routes in the Peak District here.

Chatsworth House

easter-1920x920
Image credit: Chatsworth House

Chatsworth House provides an excellent range of Easter activities and family fun from the 24th March – 8th April. Let the kids join in on the famous Easter Egg Hunt and chase after the Easter bunny, whilst you explore the breath-taking Chatsworth gardens. Chatsworth has something for everyone, book tickets online to avoid missing out.

Cromford Mills

cromford mills

Cromford Mills have an exciting Easter weekend planned for the whole family. Considered as the birthplace of the factory system, what happened at Sir Richard Arkwright’s first mill complex in the 1770’s changed the world we live in. Children can have fun on the Easter egg hunt trail and learn a little about our industrial heritage at the same time. You can meet the barn owls and there are also outdoor and indoor games (incase it rains!). There’s also a canal boat trip, barbeque and market stalls – something for all the family. The visitor centre is wheelchair accessible and there is a changing places toilet at Cromford Wharf.  

The good news is that the event is free, although some activities have a small charge, for more information click here.

Leawood Pumphouse

Leawood Pump HouseFor those interested in engineering if you wander further along the canal you will find Leawood Pumphouse built in 1849 to pump water from the River Derwent into Cromford Canal.

The unique 1849 Graham & Co. beam engine is powered by steam from two locomotive style boilers built by the Midland Railway around 1900, and is very impressive in action. Although over 150 years old it is in full working order and will be in steam on 1st and 2nd April. Read more about our stroll along the Cromford Canal and visit to Leawood Pumphouse.

 Crich Tramway Village

 

 

 

Crich Tramway Village has two events over the Easter period. For family fun with the little ones, take part in the Make-do-and-mend activity days, open from Monday 26th to 29th March.

Or turn back the clocks on Easter Sunday and Monday for World War II Home Front event and step into 1945. There will be a mix of live music, wartime road and military vehicles and vintage trams. Enter into the spirit of the event and dress up in 1940’s clothes, and you’ll pay a reduced admission charge!

The Heights of Abraham

heightsabraham
image credit: Visit Peak District

One of the Peak District’s most popular destination, The Heights of Abraham is perfect for a Family day trip. Step onto one of the cable cars and be prepared to be wowed by the fantastic views. Head underground to experience a day in the life of a 17th Century lead mining family. Or, if you fancy a walk, take the woodland path of the heritage walk, known as the ‘savage garden,’ famous for its natural beauty and zig-zag paths. And if that doesn’t tire out the kids, let them take part in the dinosaur egg hunt or burn off all their energy at the adventure playground. 

There’s so much to do this Easter in the Peak District, from Kayaking to Easter Egg hunts, get ready to explore with the whole family. We hope you’ve found our ideas helpful! 

Felicity 

Bah Humbug – Oh Dickens it’s Christmas at Chatsworth

Chatsworth chapel What the Dickens! It’s Christmas at Chatsworth House and once again there is the most spectacular display of Christmas cheer, with just a few bah humbugs thrown in. With book characters as your guide the spirit of Christmases past will be upon you!

The theme for this year’s Christmas celebrations at Chatsworth House is the famed Victorian author and social critic Charles Dickens.

His epic stories, vivid characters and detailed description of contemporary life are unforgettable.

His novels have become much loved classics including, Oliver Twist, A Christmas Carol, Nicholas Nickleby, David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities and Great Expectations.  He cleverly crafted some of the world’s best-known fictional characters, including Uriah Heep, the Artful Dodger, Fagin, Miss Havisham and of course Scrooge.Miss Haversham and FaginDickens was born in Portsmouth in 1812, the second of eight children. His father, John Dickens, was a naval clerk who dreamed of striking it rich, but instead fell into debt, so the whole family ended up in a debtor’s prison. His first novel, Oliver Twist, which follows the life of an orphan living in the streets, was inspired by how Dickens felt as a penniless child forced to get by on his wits and earn his own keep.

Charles also lived through the Industrial Revolution and through his many characters he was able to chart how life was changing, especially for the poor people.

8 fascinating facts about Charles Dickens

  1. He first won fame in 1836 with the antics of the cockney sportsmen portrayed in The Pickwick Papers. Like many of Dickens’ stories this came out in monthly instalments, chapter by chapter. Perhaps this is why Dickens’ books make good films and TV series!
  2. Dickens was an insomniac, often roaming the streets of London in the early hours of the morning; the people he met and things he saw were later brought to life in his stories.
  3. Dickens was interested in the paranormal and was a member of The Ghost Club. Inspiration perhaps for A Christmas Carol? After his death Marley is sent back to earth as a ghost in heavy chains, as punishment for being such a greedy, hard-hearted business man, and to warn his old partner Scrooge to mend his miserly ways.Scrooge
  4. Famous during later life, Charles Dickens was a house guest at Chatsworth House. I think he would have been delighted with the spectacular Christmas displays you will see!
  5. Famous in death, Dickens has appeared on the British £10 note.
  6. He was a prolific writer and throughout his stories he wrote over 4.6million words, and many of his novels are much loved classics.
  7. He invented many words we still use today such as, butterfingers and slowcoach. My favourite less well know is “trumpery”, meaning something of apparent value, but little real worth or use!
  8. Charles Dickens died in June 1870 and is buried in Poet’s Corner at Westminster Abbey.

On your tour around Chatsworth House you will discover the splendour and squalor of Dickensian London, with Victorian shop fronts, the London Docks, Scrooge’s bed and much more all magnificently dressed for Christmas.

Man made out of booksThe decorated rooms sparkle to life with hundreds of Christmas baubles and twinkling decorations. The displays are as imaginative as Charles Dickens stories.

My favourite is the character cleverly created out of actual books in the entrance hall.

There is also plenty of opportunity for interaction. Children will love trying to spot Bill Sykes’ dog, Bullseye, as they follow through the house, and can also have fun dressing up. You may also encounter Miss Haversham or the dastardly Bill Sykes. Be warned – definitely don’t turn your back on Fagin or you may find your watch is missing!Chatsworth4wEB Chatsworth5 Chatsworth6 500 Chatsworth9Web

“I will honour Christmas in my heart and try to keep it all the year”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

Oh Dickens it’s Christmas is on from now until 7th January (except 24th, 25th, 26th December 2017 and 1st January 2018). We hope you enjoy your visit as much as we did!

Check here for our December availability in our cosy log cabins and gorgeous glamping pods.

Felicity

 

Share our #UniqueDistrict – photo competition

Have you visited the Peak District?

Have you stayed at Hoe Grange Holidays or visited the Peak District? If so, what’s your all time favourite place or activity?

By simply sharing your #UniqueDistrict experience of our stunning region on social media you could win some fabulous prizes, one of which is a short break in our gorgeous glamping pods!

It’s quick and easy to get involved. During September and October share inspirational photos of your experiences and what you think makes the Peak District unique using #UniqueDistrict on Twitter and tag @vpdd or Instagram and tag @visitpeakdistrict.

What inspires you?

It could be anything from stunning scenery, wicked wildlife, getting active outdoors rock climbing, walking, caving, canoeing or rock climbing, a selfie at one of the amazing attractions, meandering through the market towns and villages, finding #LoveLocal products at the artisan markets, or perhaps relaxing with friends over the best brewed pint of local beer.Artisan marketYou can post as many photos as you like. Anything which best depicts your unique experience here in the Peak District, that will hopefully inspire someone else to visit the area!DogWalk Millstone EdgeThe Peak District was designated the first National Park back in 1951. If you have visited our stunning region you will know it consists of two distinct areas; The southern White Peak with its steep limestone valleys including Lathkill Dale and Dovedale, with its famous stepping stones, and The northern Dark Peak with its dramatic gritstone ridges and heather covered moorlands including Kinder Scout.Hands Well featuring Beatrix Potter animalsDid you know that Castleton is the only place in the world where the semi-precious stone Blue John can be found? That definitely counts as #UniqueDistrict, as does the ancient art of Well Dressing, where plants and petals are pressed onto clay boards to create amazing pictures in celebration of pure water from the wells!

Chatsworth House is another #UniqueDistrict jewel of the Derbyshire Peak District, home of the Dukes of Devonshire, with amazing gardens designed by Capability Brown and set in over 35,000 acres of stunning parkland.Chatsworth Cascade #UniqueDistrict Hardwick Hall, now run by the National Trust, was built by the formidable Elizabeth Countess of Shrewsbury or “Bess of Hardwick”. This lavish house, often said to be more glass than wall, was a reflection of the wealth that Bess accumulated by marring four times, so that she became the wealthiness woman in the country!

Other famous people with links to Derbyshire include Izaak Walton, author of ‘The Compleat Angler’, who fished along the Rover Dove. The book was first published in 1653 and is one of the most reprinted books in the history of English literature.

Visit Peak District and Derbyshire are running the #UniqueDistrict competition until 1st November, so get snapping and sharing using #UniqueDistrict. Anything memorable, exciting or unusual counts.dog-friendly glampingDon’t forget to tag @vpdd on Twitter or @visitpeakdistrict on Instagram to be in with a chance to win a short break in our gorgeous glamping pods!#UniqueDistrict competitionGood luck!

Felicity

 

RHS Chatsworth Flower Show

RHS ChatsworthFollowing on from the fabulous flowers at Tissington Well Dressings the Derbyshire hills overflowed with beautiful blooms at the first ever RHS Chatsworth Flower Show today. Amazingly even after yesterdays drenching downpour and gale force stormy winds the show gardens still looked stunning.

The IQ Quarry Garden designed by Paul Hervey-Brookes is well deserving of The Best Show Garden and Best Construction Award.

IQ Quarry GardenThe life cycle of a quarry is beautifully illustrated as you travel from the stark stone, slate and rusted wall of the industrial to the soft natural planting as Mother Nature conquers all even in the harshest of environments. I think you’ll agree the combination of formal structure and natural planting creates a beautiful garden of many contrasts.

wire dandelion flower

One of our other favourite show gardens was the Experience Peak District & Derbyshire Garden – perhaps because it reflects our dramatic Peak District landscape and perhaps because of the hand painted metallic cows – far less trouble than our suckler herd at home!

Lee Bestall MSGD cleverly designed the garden in 2 completely contrasting parts, reflecting the many aspects of the Peak District and achieving a prestigious Silver-Gilt Medal in the process!

Experience Peak District & DerbyshireA central mown path leads through rough grass inspired by the fields of Derbyshire. It is peppered with native trees and hand-painted cows, the latter a fun and quirky nod to Sir George Sitwell’s remark that blue stenciled white cows would ‘give distinction to the landscape’.

Peak District Show GardenThe second half of the garden takes inspiration from the formal gardens of the great houses, such as Chatsworth and Haddon Hall, with precise herbaceous planting and clipped topiary yew trees shaped into pyramids adding height.

hand painted cowFollowing the show the cows will be auctioned off to the highest bidder but the planting will live on as a new garden room feature at Renishaw Hall in Derbyshire.

The colourful display by Tissington Nursery showed their passion for plants and again reflected the Peak District landscape earning them a Silver Gilt Medal too. Tissington Nursery awarded Silver Gilt MedalJuliet Forrest glass sculptureIt was wonderful to see so many fantastic #LoveLocal businesses – Peak District Artisans, Annette Petch Jewellery, Rebecca Lawley Silver, Karin Sheldon Artist in Precious Metals and Rita Chang Animal & Wildlife Artist, working together to showcase their Peak District crafts at RHS Chatsworth.

Juliet Forrest created the most amazing glass sculpture which would look fantastic at Hoe Grange, but as it was slightly above my budget I opted for some beautiful coloured glass flowers to brighten up the flower beds.

Glass flowersAnother highlight was the Palladian Bridge, a vibrant and colourful sensory experience of floral artistry by Jonathan Moseley. It was a radiant rainbow from floor to ceiling of the most amazing flowers, from the traditional to the exotic, reflecting the eclectic collections at Chatsworth. There were so many blooms I can’t even begin to imagine how long it all took to construct!

Palladian bridge floral display So many wonderful displays and creations at the RHS Chatsworth Flower Show that we can’t mention them all here, but there are plenty more photos on our Hoe Grange Holidays Facebook.

Tickets sold out completely so book early if you want to experience RHS Chatsworth next year!

Felicity

boxing hares

Bug Hotel
Love this bug hotel!

Bee

waterfeature trees

 

Christmas at Chatsworth

Here is a sneeky peek at the enchanting winter wonderland created for Christmas at Chatsworth House this year, inspired by the time-honoured classic, ‘The Nutcracker and the Mouse King’ by ETA Hoffmann.
Chatsworth great hall

The stunning, sparkling Christmas decorations are enhanced by the historic backdrop of Chatsworth House. I particularly loved the sparkling suspended snowflakes in the Chapel.

Chatsworth Chapel

Why not get into the festive spirit and join in Clara’s adventures as she is swept away by her Nutcracker Prince?

clockworksThe Nutcracker story

It all begins on Christmas eve with a special present. Clara and Fritz have a very special, skillful godfather who makes inventions out of clockwork parts (or perhaps they are magical) and his Christmas presents are always amazing and wonderful.

However this year he gives them something different, something rather small and simple  – a nutcracker-doll in the form of a soldier.

nutcracker toy

mice It’s somewhat ugly, and soon broken by her brother, but Clara loves the little soldier all the same. Clara falls asleep under the Christmas tree and dreams of adventures in candy-filled kingdoms.

Her wish comes true when the soldier-shaped nutcracker springs to life and becomes a true hero, taking her into a magical world to defeat the scary seven-headed Mouse King.

However I think the Chatsworth Christmas mice are more cute than scary!

sweetie train

 

The Nutcracker Ballet

The story also inspired Tchaikovsky’s ballet The Nutcracker. For those of you who can’t get enough of the magic at Chatsworth, Buxton Opera House is showing The Nutcracker on January 7th 2017.

Christmas tree of ballet shoesA treat for you our guests

we thought you would like to know that when you buy tickets here for the ballet, you can also purchase discounted tickets to the Christmas at Chatsworth experience. Hope you all have fun!

Felicity 

nutcracker ballet

Capability Brown’s 300th Anniversary

It’s the 300th anniversary of the birth of Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown, known as ‘England’s Greatest Gardener,’ so why not celebrate by visiting his gardens in Derbyshire?

He’s best known for his beautiful gardens on a grand scale; an artful recreation of idyllic countryside. Brown got his name by telling his landowning clients that their gardens had great “capability”. He believed that design and practicality went hand in hand. His parklands not only promised privacy, and grounds for hunting, but also space for architectural follies to demonstrate the owners immense wealth and status.

Lancelot 'Capbility' BrownLancelot ‘Capability’ Brown was born in 1716 and began his career as a gardener at Kirkharle. Once he learnt his trade he became an independent designer and contractor, and over time his workforce grew and the demand for his gardening expertise increased. As a result of his unique ability to see the “capabilities” of an entire landscape Brown became a household name.

His abundant skills as an artist, an engineer and a formidable business man brought fame and fortune and in 1764 Capability became a Royal Garden at Hampton Court and Kew Gardens in London. In his lifetime it’s thought that he designed and transformed over 250 gardens across the UK, changing the face of the English countryside. His legacy is still admired across the world today.

The Capability Brown Festival

Capability Brown 300 yearsThe festival is a celebration of Capability Brown’s work, with a number of events and exhibitions. The festival will open up a number of Brown’s sites for all audiences to learn about his work and enjoy the sites he envisioned. Brown’s style derived from the two practical principles of comfort and elegance. On the one hand, there was a determination that everything should work, and that a landscape should provide for every need of the great house. On the other, his landscapes had to look elegant.

Find out more on the Capability Brown website.

Visit Capabilities’ Legendary Gardens in Derbyshire

Chatsworth Gardens

In the 1760s Capability Brown worked at Chatsworth House to modernise the grounds by re-developing the landscape, moving earth, planting trees and drainage. Capability and his foreman Michael Millican allowed the landscape to look natural by creating rolling green slopes up to the House, whilst at the same time increasing the level of capability the land.

Chatsworth House

From the famous mirroring of Chatsworth House in the lake’s reflection, to the rolling hills and carefully placed trees Brown’s garden design is still to be admired at Chatsworth House today. Without his pioneering work, Chatsworth Gardens and estate would not be the same today.

Elvaston Castle Country Park in Derby

If you fancy the drive orElvaston Country park are heading towards Derby, why not stop off at Elvaston Castle to see Brown’s historic work here. With 361 acres of open land to discover, and a wildlife area, it’s the perfect spot for a summer picnic and a great day out with the family.

Capability Brown has inspired landscapers and gardeners since his pioneering work in the 18th Century. If you want to find a garden by Capability Brown near you, here’s an interactive map of the UK. If you’re planning a trip to the Peak District or planning a stay at Hoe Grange, don’t miss out on the Capability Brown festival.

Felicity

5 Reasons to go Glamping in the Peak District

Our Glamping pods bring a new twist to regular camping. Forget the pet-hates of regular camping under canvas and enjoy all the great benefits of Glamping. If you haven’t heard of Glamping before, it’s a glamorous version of camping with the joys of traditional camping, but with modern facilities; and you don’t even have to struggle to put your own tent up!

Here’s our top 5 reasons why you should go Glamping in the Peak District.

1. Gorgeous glamping for two

Our gorgeous glamping pods are ideal for couples; warm and cosy with plenty of space for two, with fabulous views of the Peak District countryside. We know that it’s the small things make all the difference, such as sleeping in a real bed, boiling the kettle for a cup of tea in the morning, having a spacious shower and a proper flushing toilet without having to creep across the campsite in the dead of night!

Why go Glamping in the Peak District Glamping pod under constructionHere’s another sneaky peek at our amazing glamping pods under construction by James and his team at My Shire Houses. We also have a few extra little touches, including LED mood lighting in the porch and the beautiful colouful stained glass window whose design was created by local artist Juliet Forrest and inspired by our special landscape.

These delightful luxuries really help to enhance your regular camping holiday, and there’s more! After a day out exploring all that the Peak District has to offer you can relax and unwind in the outdoor Swedish hot tub under the stars, or ease any tired muscles in the log fired sauna.

2. The Peak District is a central location

The Peak District offers activities for all, inclusive of those with disabilities and is an ideal central base for meeting up with family and friends and from which to explore the wonders of The Peak District. From lazy walks on accessible trails with picturesque views, to energetic water sports and breath-taking cycle routes. The Peak District is truly a playground for all, from finding a cosy country pub to visiting Chatsworth House, the jewel in the crown, to exploring underground caverns with unique Blue John gems or taking a tram ride back in time at Crich Tramway Village.

3. Glamping is so much more than just camping

Glamping means, arriving at your holiday destination with all of the hard work done for you. As soon as you arrive you can relax and start enjoying your break rather than having to get in a tangle setting up the tent and pumping up the air beds. A spot of rain won’t dampen your spirits as you’ll be lovely and dry in our Glamping pods which are well insulated and have double glazed doors. Unlike sleeping in a drafty tent, you won’t be exposed to the elements, you’ll be protected no matter what the weather and the infrared heating will keep you warm and cosy.

If you want to take a break from it all our country location is peaceful and quiet, but if you want to stay in touch our Glamping pods also have electric sockets to keep your phone and tablet charged throughout your stay.

4. Fire-up the BBQ

Toasting marshmallowsWhilst Glamping you can sizzle your sausages on our BBQ, or enjoy toasting marshmallows round the fire-pit. The Peak District has a wealth of artisan food producers so you can easily source fresh produce for a scrumptious summer BBQ. You can enjoy the outdoors, eat alfresco and sup your wine whilst watching the sun setting over the hillside.

Our glamping pods have an induction hob and a combination microwave so you can easily cater for yourselves, and you can also have local foods delivered directly to your glamping pod. However if you want a break from the kitchen and don’t want to cook, we can help! At Hoe Grange, we offer a fabulous take away breakfast service or why not treat yourself to a farmhouse cream tea?

5. Year round Holiday Destination

Hobbit style glamping podOne of the great benefits of Glamping pods is that you can enjoy them all year round. Even when it’s wet and windy, you’ll feel warm and cosy, come snow, rain or sleet. This is because the Glamping pods are made from timber, are well insulated and have double glazed doors. So heat up some hot chocolate and enjoy the stunning views through the massive circular window .

Glamping offers great value for money as well as an eco-friendly alternative to a foreign holiday. There’s so much to do whether you want to relax and soak up the natural beauty of the Peaks or go on an adventure. Our farm welcomes everyone and when staying with us you can even bring your horse on holiday.

Read more about our Glamping pods here. Why not give glamping a try? Choose either Swallow or Skylark when you book online or call us on 01629 540262.

We know you’ll love it!

Felicity

Slow Travel in The Peak District

In today’s fast moving technological world we sometimes forget to slow down and take time to enjoy and explore the world around us.

Bradt SLow Guide to The Peak DistrictHowever help is at hand from the latest Bradt Slow Travel Guide which celebrates our fabulous Peak District.This captivating and extensive guide is the perfect travel companion detailing where to taste the region’s best produce, which accommodation offers character and colour (naturally featuring our Hoe Grange Holidays self-catering log cabins!), travel tips on how to make the most of your stay and some fascinating facts surrounding the quirky traditions and stories of local folks.

Bradt’s Slow Travel Peak District brings a new perspective to this much-loved area. Slow down and let expert local author Helen Moat guide you to not just all the well-known places, but away from the crowds to uncover the hidden corners of the Peak District. The author’s love of interesting and colourful stories is linked to the natural and manmade features of the area, highlighting the quirky and unusual, places and points of interest off the beaten tourist track, from dales to abandoned mills, historical ruins, strange follies and irresistible pubs.

Author Helen MoatHelen moved to the Peak District in 1999 and has over time come to realise that “you could live a lifetime in the Peak District and still not cover every bridleway, packhorse route or public footpath. This book is only a taster – and hopefully an inspiration for your own exploration.

Writing Slow Travel Peak District has allowed me to engage with the Slow philosophy as never before: to look up, look down and catch the detail; to stand and stare and ponder; to wander down hidden dells or jitties. I’ve learned to stop and chat with strangers: National Trust volunteers, foodies, twitchers, ramblers,climbers and river swimmers, to name but a few – and found them eager to share their knowledge of and passion for the Peak District. I’ve learned to read the landscape, from the ruin on the hilltop to the tell-tale rise of an Iron Age hillfort or an abandoned mill. I’ve learned the songs of birds and to scan the hillsides for signs of life. It has been a life-enriching experience.”

As part of her research for the guide Helen visited us at Hoe Grange and loved our cosy log cabins nestled in the undulating limestone hills.

“This pretty, immaculate farm, set in rolling countryside below the High Peak Trail offers four spacious log cabins, three sleeping four and one sleeping six. Owners, Felicity and David, have worked hard to reduce the business’s carbon footprint with solar panels and wind turbine, supplying much of the farm’s energy requirements. The couple are fastidious in their attention to detail and in their care of visitors, personally greeting guests on arrival, and welcoming them with homegrown flowers, home-made biscuits and bread, along with free-range eggs from the farm. The lantern lit barrel-shaped sauna and wood-fuelled hot tub on the edge of the farm also add a nice touch for total relaxation under the stars at the end of a busy day . But it’s the award-winning ‘access for all’ accommodation, along with stabling for horse owners that makes this accommodation special. A few hundred yards up through fields will take walkers, cyclists and horse riders onto the High Peak Trail, with stunning views of the countryside. There’s even a Boma 7 all-terrain wheelchair for guests with limited mobility.”

Whether following Helen’s favourite walks and bike rides, venturing into hidden dales, caves and ravines, ambling through the national park’s charming villages or biting into a freshly baked Bakewell Pudding, you’ll find the Slow Travel The Peak District  goes far beyond conventional guide books in celebrating our special region and is an invaluable source of information – I can’t put my copy down!

Why not order your own copy of Bradt’s new Slow Travel Peak District guidebook?

For an exclusive 20% discount visit www.bradtguides.com and enter the code HOEGRANGE at the checkout.

Happy reading!

Felicity