Peak District Boundary Walk

There are so many things to do in The Peak District, but why not use our outdoor gym and explore our special scenic landscape by following the new Peak District Boundary walk?Ballidon QuarryAt Hoe Grange Holidays we have long been supporters of Friends of The Peak District. This active charitable organisation supports local communities, champions renewable energies to help tackle climate change, campaigns to safeguard and also helps to maintain the unique landscapes of Britain’s first national park.

Peak District Boundary WalkIn celebration of Britain’s first and arguably most beautiful national park, Friends of The Peak District have created a brand new long distance (190-mile) walking route around its entire boundary.

Don’t worry if you think 190 miles is too much of a challenge, the walk has been split into smaller stages so you don’t have to tackle it all in one go!

The Peak District Boundary Walk passes through stunning scenery, stretching from the moorland tops of the South Pennines to the gentle limestone scenery of the Derbyshire Dales near Hoe Grange. The route touches the urban edges of Sheffield and Oldham, as well as Staffordshire’s rugged moorland and the undulating slopes of Cheshire.

The Peak District Boundary Walk follows existing footpaths, tracks, quiet lanes, former railway lines and a canal towpath, but it is the variety of vistas that makes experience extra special. What could be better than keeping fit by using the outdoor gym!

High Peak Trail Hoe Grange Farm is situated right on the Peak Park boundary so the walk goes right past our door, along The High Peak Trail. If staying with us in one of our cosy log cabins or our gorgeous glamping pods for two, you can easily walk over our fields to pick up one of two sections of The Peak District Boundary Walk. Either Royston Grange to Winster (stage 13) or Royston through Parwich to Thorpe (stage 14).

Peak District Boundary Walk
Stage 13 Winster, past Hoe Grange to Royston

sheep with lambsRoyston is one of my favourite walks as you pass through the steep beautiful limestone valley, surrounded by nothing but rocky pastures full of wild flowers, fluttering butterflies, hawthorn trees silhouetted against the skyline, buzzards circling overhead, and the odd sheep or cow.

You can check out the individual stages of The Boundary Walk or buy the complete book which features all 20 walks for just £10 plus £2.50 p&p.

Riding along Royston Friends of the Peak District campaign for a living, working countryside that changes with time but remains beautiful for ever. Their aim is to ensure the balance is kept between a vibrant, sustainable rural economy and protecting the outstanding Peak District countryside.

They hope this new boundary walk will increase awareness of the beautiful Peak District landscape and encourage people to cherish and protect it.

Find out more about Friends of the Peak District and help us to protect and conserve this stunning landscape. Why not make a donation to this worthwhile charity?

Felicity

Ashbourne Sheep Fair

Ashbourne Sheep Fair today was a real celebration of all things sheep. There was a great turn out of folk to watch the hand shearing demonstrations, wool yarn spinning and the mock auction, which all gave the public an insight into the history and tradition of sheep farming in the Derbyshire Peak District.

shearing sheep by hand      spinning yarn

It was fabulous to see 17 breeds of sheep on display so that you could get up really close and compare the differences. The length and quality of wool varies tremendously, some sheep produce better meat and watch out as some breeds have the most amazing impressive horns!

whiteface woodland sheep
Whitefaced Woodland Sheep

There were lots of fun family activities from, guess the weight of the sheep, a sheep bran tub with a difference, to live music.

sheep fair crafts The market stalls were packed with #LoveLocal sheep related goodies including, Snelston Tweed fabrics and clothing, the The Woolroom duvets, mattresses and pillows, Drynose Dog Designs with wonderful quirky glass ware and gifts and David’s favourites – chocolate sheep-shaped lollies and cider from Kniveton Cider Company pressed from local apples.

If you had a question there were plenty of expert farmers on hand to explain the different attributes of the various breeds and geographically where they are best suited to graze.

ask a farmer      sheep farmer  It was wonderful to see some more local rare breeds including the Whiteface Woodland and the Derbyshire Gritstone, one of the oldest breeds, which as the name suggests, is native to the North of the Peak District, where it can thrive on the moorlands.

Derbyshire Grtistone sheep
Derbyshire Gritstone Sheep

Valais Blacknose Sheep For wool quality and sheer cute “ahh” factor the Valais Blacknose stole the show with their fluffy curly fleeces. As you can tell by their little bells round their necks they are not native to Derbyshire, but come from Switzerland. This means that they are adapted to hill pastures, and are thus becoming more popular in the UK.

You can find out more about the various sheep breeds on the Ashbourne Sheep Fair website.

The Sheep Fair took place on the main market square where weekly markets have been held since the first charter in 1257! It was a great success and is sure to take place again next year so why not join in the fun?

In the meantime the good news is that the Ashbourne Artisan Market is being launched on 10th September and will take place on the second Sunday of every month. I can’t wait to see what #LoveLocal delights will be on sale!

Felicity

TripAdvisor ® Certificate of Excellence 2017

Felicity and I are delighted to announce that we have received a TripAdvisor® Certificate of Excellence for the 7th time in the seven years since its introduction. A real achievement thanks to our dedicated housekeeping team and all you lovely guests.

We really appreciate the time you take to leave such wonderful online reviews about our cosy log cabins and gorgeous glamping pods in the Peak District .

TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence

TripAdvisor Certificate of ExcellenceThe Certificate of Excellence accounts for the quality, quantity and recency of reviews submitted by travellers on TripAdvisor over a 12-month period. To qualify, a business must maintain an overall TripAdvisor bubble rating of at least four out of five, and have a minimum number of reviews.

TripAdvisor is such a fabulous resource for anyone booking a staycation or self-catering holiday as the reviews show what you, our guests, actually think, and after all that’s what really counts!

With our outstanding overall TripAdvisor bubble rating of 5, guests can book with confidence, knowing the level of service and quality of accommodation is second to none.

In today’s technological online world reviews and scores are increasingly more important than the traditional star ratings, as reviews are based on experiences and hospitality, rather than the quality of the teaspoons!! Although the cabins do have very nice teaspoons, and a better equipped kitchen than our own house!

Hot tubs

To ensure we maintain high standards at Hoe Grange Holidays we are constantly reviewing and updating our facilities to keep up with modern demands and trends. To this end we have recently added hot tubs on the decking of two of the four log cabins.

Hot tub on Pinder log cabinIt’s not just about our fabulous location in the Derbyshire Peak District. Hot tub is  now one of the most popular searches when people Google their next holiday accommodation.

We have to agree hot tubs are a wonderfully relaxing experience, especially in such a peaceful place. You can truly relax in the soothing bubbling hot tubs on Daisybank or Pinder decking and watch the world go by – what better way to view the stunning Peak District scenery?

daisybank hot tub Our only problem is that the cabins with hot tubs are so popular we never get chance to use them ourselves!

If you want to make the most of your staycation at Hoe Grange and book a holiday in a log cabin with a hot tub you’ll have to get in early – when they’re booked, they’re booked!

David

Eroica Britannia – can you ride a tandem?

Inspired by Eroica Britannia 2016 and as rashly promised in our Eroica blog last year, David and I completed our challenge in style cycling the 25 mile route on our 1930’s tandem!

Having written my blog last year, recklessly thinking it would be fun to take part, even joking about cycling two up on a tandem, David got straight on ebay and within 2 days had purchased our vintage tandem – a real shock and surprise to me!

Eroica Britannia 2017For those who haven’t heard of Eroica Britannia before it is billed as ‘The World’s Most Handsome Bike Ride’ and it certainly lived up to the claim, with over 4,500 riders taking part on vintage bicycles, many dressed in authentic costumes.

Luckily for me this non competitive cycle ride is not a race – it is as much about the fashion, the stunning Peak District scenery and the ice cream pit stops along the way, as it is about the cycling. As you can see we entered into the spirit of the occasion and donned our best bib and tucker!

A firm Festival favourite is the best in show competitions, from stylish outfits to the most impressive moustache – everyone entered into the spirit of the event.

Best in show

 

Penny Farthing To qualify for entry into Eroica Britannia all bikes have to be authentic, manufactured before 1986 and have shift gears on the bicycle frame, not the handlebars. These older bikes tend to have heavy frames and less gears than today’s modern bicycles, so therefore the hills are a little more challenging – one determined chap even completed the 25 mile route on a Penny Farthing which must have been a real bone shaker!

Riding a tandem is a little challenging to start with because you both have to synchronize movements as any wobbles from your partner can throw you off balance. Also the rear rider (often called the stoker!) has no control over speed or direction, which I found disconcerting to start with. David found that going downhill too fast hurt his ears – due to the loud squealing from behind!

Having got over the initial difficulties with many trips over the hill to the pub in Brassington, we soon mastered the tandem technique.

As you will see there were 3 routes to choose from. We thought with the steep Peak District hills that the 25 mile route was enough of a trial for us on our first official tandem outing. A good choice as ride day turned out to be one of the hottest days of the year!

Eroica ride routesAs we live so close to the Friden venue we decided to cycle to and from the Eroica event adding another 8 miles to our total ride. The most challenging section of the whole ride was getting there, dodging the hundreds of cyclists who had already set off along the High Peak Trail on the 55 mile event, going in the opposite direction to us! We also nearly lost our voices as everyone shouted greetings and good morning as they cycled past.

We set off at 9am with a group of other 25 milers, full of enthusiasm, with the sun shining and my red polka dot skirt flapping in the breeze. The great thing about a tandem is that just when one of you is beginning to give up the other one urges you on to keep going. With determination we managed to ride the whole way without having to dismount for the steep hills.  One of the toughest sections was pedaling up the long hill out of Monyash, which was made slightly harder as the climb came immediately after the lunch stop and we hadn’t got back into our rhythm.

cycling Peak District It was so much fun riding the tandem as people waved and cheered you on. It was  a fabulous feeling to cycle through the finish line to cheers and whistles from the gathered crowd.

The atmosphere was amazing with lots of Festival fun, from the fun fair for the children, to evening entertainment from ABC, and a fly past by a Hurricane Spitfire.

after the Eroica rideWould we do it again? YES – definitely a fantastic experience to complete the challenge.

However after our exhausting ride David was eagerly eyeing up an electric bike from Juicy Bikes – you would certainly breeze up the Peak District hills on one of their battery assisted bicycles.Juicy electric bikes

Everyone was so friendly and the festival atmosphere was fabulous with everyone comparing bikes and chatting about their experiences late into the evening. Of course the weather helped – not sure it would be quite so much fun in the rain!

Eroica cyclistWe were delighted to host two sets of guests for the weekend who were also taking part, which created a real Eroica spirit at Hoe Grange.

They were all more ambitious (and not riding tandems) so chose the longer 55 mile Eroica ride – a real challenge in the blistering heat.

If you fancy taking part next year why not book yourself a cabin here at Hoe Grange as a very handy base? I would suggest Daisybank or Pinder log cabins, as they both have hot tubs on the decking for soaking those aching limbs afterwards!

Felicity

 

RHS Chatsworth Flower Show

RHS ChatsworthFollowing on from the fabulous flowers at Tissington Well Dressings the Derbyshire hills overflowed with beautiful blooms at the first ever RHS Chatsworth Flower Show today. Amazingly even after yesterdays drenching downpour and gale force stormy winds the show gardens still looked stunning.

The IQ Quarry Garden designed by Paul Hervey-Brookes is well deserving of The Best Show Garden and Best Construction Award.

IQ Quarry GardenThe life cycle of a quarry is beautifully illustrated as you travel from the stark stone, slate and rusted wall of the industrial to the soft natural planting as Mother Nature conquers all even in the harshest of environments. I think you’ll agree the combination of formal structure and natural planting creates a beautiful garden of many contrasts.

wire dandelion flower

One of our other favourite show gardens was the Experience Peak District & Derbyshire Garden – perhaps because it reflects our dramatic Peak District landscape and perhaps because of the hand painted metallic cows – far less trouble than our suckler herd at home!

Lee Bestall MSGD cleverly designed the garden in 2 completely contrasting parts, reflecting the many aspects of the Peak District and achieving a prestigious Silver-Gilt Medal in the process!

Experience Peak District & DerbyshireA central mown path leads through rough grass inspired by the fields of Derbyshire. It is peppered with native trees and hand-painted cows, the latter a fun and quirky nod to Sir George Sitwell’s remark that blue stenciled white cows would ‘give distinction to the landscape’.

Peak District Show GardenThe second half of the garden takes inspiration from the formal gardens of the great houses, such as Chatsworth and Haddon Hall, with precise herbaceous planting and clipped topiary yew trees shaped into pyramids adding height.

hand painted cowFollowing the show the cows will be auctioned off to the highest bidder but the planting will live on as a new garden room feature at Renishaw Hall in Derbyshire.

The colourful display by Tissington Nursery showed their passion for plants and again reflected the Peak District landscape earning them a Silver Gilt Medal too. Tissington Nursery awarded Silver Gilt MedalJuliet Forrest glass sculptureIt was wonderful to see so many fantastic #LoveLocal businesses – Peak District Artisans, Annette Petch Jewellery, Rebecca Lawley Silver, Karin Sheldon Artist in Precious Metals and Rita Chang Animal & Wildlife Artist, working together to showcase their Peak District crafts at RHS Chatsworth.

Juliet Forrest created the most amazing glass sculpture which would look fantastic at Hoe Grange, but as it was slightly above my budget I opted for some beautiful coloured glass flowers to brighten up the flower beds.

Glass flowersAnother highlight was the Palladian Bridge, a vibrant and colourful sensory experience of floral artistry by Jonathan Moseley. It was a radiant rainbow from floor to ceiling of the most amazing flowers, from the traditional to the exotic, reflecting the eclectic collections at Chatsworth. There were so many blooms I can’t even begin to imagine how long it all took to construct!

Palladian bridge floral display So many wonderful displays and creations at the RHS Chatsworth Flower Show that we can’t mention them all here, but there are plenty more photos on our Hoe Grange Holidays Facebook.

Tickets sold out completely so book early if you want to experience RHS Chatsworth next year!

Felicity

boxing hares

Bug Hotel
Love this bug hotel!

Bee

waterfeature trees

 

Tissington Well Dressings 2017

For Tissington Ascension Tide is an extremely hectic period when the whole village work tirelessly together to create the stunning, and colourful well dressings.

Hands Well TissingtonThe dressing or decorating of water wells as a thanksgiving is an ancient art that goes way back into the mists of time, so far back that no one is entirely sure of the origin.

One plausible theory is that the custom began in Tissington village just after the Black Death of 1348. The villagers were spared the ravages of the plague, and their immunity was attributed to the purity of the water.

Moor hen and chickAnother theory believes the tradition started later in 1615, after severe droughts throughout the area led to loss of cattle and crops, except at Tissington where water flowed freely from the 5 wells in the village. No one knows for sure but this ancient art is carried on with the traditional methods passed on from one generation to the next.

How are the well dressings created?

Each of the wells is decorated with a surrounding picture made from a board covered with a clay/salt mix. Several weeks prior to the well dressings you may see the boards floating in the village pond to soak them through. The boards are then plastered and the design is traced onto them.

Yew Tree Well Tissington

Cones and coffee beans are used as outlines and the filling in of the picture is done with brightly coloured flower petals, twigs, wool, feathers, stones and natural materials. This is done during the previous three days to Ascension Day.

Community spirit

Well dressing in Tissington is not just a thanksgiving but a fabulous event which brings the whole village community together. Everyone, young and old, contributes in some way to this annual celebration, digging clay, picking flowers, decorating the boards or erecting the dressings at the wells throughout the village.

Hall Well Tissington

The celebrations start on Ascension Day (celebrated on the 40th day of Easter which is always a Thursday) with a procession blessing each well and a Church service at St.Mary`s. The Well Dressings are displayed for a week and they are definitely not to be missed.

Coffin well TissingtonWho do you think modelled for this well dressing??

If you’re visiting the Derbyshire Peak District this week come and wander round the village and see the beautiful well dressings for yourself. A quirky but fascinating tradition that is “well” worth a visit!

Felicity Tissington Church

Buxton set to sparkle as a Spa town

Buxton is built on the river Wye and has an ancient history as a spa town due to its geothermal spring which rises at a constant temperature of 27.5 °C, from 5,000ft below ground. The Romans, who were renowned for their hygiene and love of taking the waters, were quick to take advantage of the geology of the area. In around AD 78 they developed a settlement there known as Aquae Arnemetiae, or “the spa of the goddess of the grove”.

In Medieval and Tudor times people continued to travel to Buxton to take the waters, with famous visitors including Bess of Hardwick and Mary Queen of Scots. However, it wasn’t until the Georgian period that Buxton really flourished as a spa town.

Buxton as a Spa Town

William Cavendish, the 5th Duke of Devonshire, used the profits from his successful Copper mine at Ecton, to revive Buxton as a spa town. The Crescent was the centrepiece of the Fifth Duke of Devonshire’s plans; built between 1780 and 1784, it was modelled on Bath’s Royal Crescent and designed to showcase the importance of the town and attract the wealthy socialites of the day.

The Crescent BuxtonThe Crescent originally incorporated a hotel, five expensive lodging houses (so the Dukes friends could stay in town), and a grand assembly room with an ornate painted ceiling.

The ground floor arcade included shops such as coffee house, a hair and wig-dresser, and there were kitchens in the basement. The Assembly Rooms were very grand and soon became the social heart of 18th-century Buxton, and “The In Place” to be seen.

Full Circle

The Crescent being restoredBuxton’s star fell, and for decades The Crescent lay empty and unloved, as you can see from the video. However the Grade 1 listed building is set to spring back to life, due to the ambitious restoration project to reinstate Buxton’s status as the spa capital of Britain.

The Crescent’s iconic building facade forms an arc of a circle facing southeast, and it will once again be an amazing showstopper when finished – I think the 5th Duke of Devonshire would be positively beaming at the idea!

The renovated spa will bring together the very best of the traditional and the modern. At the heart of the complex will be the original thermal pool, fed by mineral water from the nearby ancient spring St Ann’s Well.

In addition, there will be pampering treatments featuring mineral-packed mud, specially tailored healthy lifestyle programmes, and a host of relaxation and leisure facilities. There will also be an indoor/outdoor pool with water features, a sauna, steam and ice rooms, a fitness studio and a beauty salon. Can you picture yourself enjoying this amazing swimming pool?

Buxton spaCrucial to the success of The Buxton Crescent and Thermal Spa Scheme is a £23.8 million grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund, together with a £2 million grant from the D2N2 Local Enterprise Partnership, and £0.5 million from Historic England.

A sparkling five-star stay

Adjoining the spa complex will be an 80-bedroom five-star hotel, allowing guests to enjoy a truly luxurious spa break. The magnificent Assembly Rooms and Mineral Baths will be restored to their former glory, and there will be 6 retail units in the front ground floor.

The Natural Mineral Baths

Buxton archade glass ceilingThe original Natural Mineral Baths designed by Henry Currey, were opened in 1854 on the site of the ancient Roman baths. The building incorporated an incredible barrel vaulted stained glass canopy designed by Brian Clarke, which is the largest in Britain. The arcade was redeveloped in 1987 as a shopping centre and is worth a visit just to look up at the electric blue decorative glass ceiling.

Taking the waters at The Pump Room

Insode The Pump Room at BuxtonThe Pump Room, also designed by Currey, was built in 1884 opposite The Crescent and next to St Ann’s Well.

Whilst you could drink spa water free of charge from the public well, the Pump Room enabled genteel visitors to sip the waters away from the hoi polloi, for the charge of one penny.

The Pump Room BuxtonThe Pump Room was presented by the Duke of Devonshire to the town in 1894 and continued as such until 1981 when it became home to the world’s first Micrarium. This housed 44 special microscopes to study close-up microscopic organisms, plant life and geological specimens. The dream of Dr Stephen Carter, a researcher with ICI Pharmaceuticals, the Micrarium attracted an enthusiastic following and became a popular place to visit until it closed in 1995. Many of you may also remember it as The Tourist Information Centre.

The Pump Room The exciting news is that The Pump Room is also currently being refurbished as part of the National Lottery-funded Buxton Crescent and Thermal Spa re-development.

Pump Room with DomesAs you can see in this early photo, the building originally had twin domes or cupolas which disappeared at some point, probably due to the high cost of maintaining them. Sadly these will not be replaced, but it will still be an impressive building when completed.

Stained glass windowThe restored Pump Room will imaginatively bring to life the many fascinating stories about Buxton, it’s relationship with the water, the Crescent and Natural baths in a creative mix of performances, installations, interpretations, events and programmes.

When fully opened the pump room will once again enable visitors to taste the pure Buxton water and provide space to discover more about Buxton’s spa history.

So as you see Buxton is set once more to sparkle as a spa town – odd how history often repeats itself!

Felicity

 

Porsche tour of the Peak District – Part one

In celebration of English Tourism Week, #etw2017, we wanted to showcase some of our local Peak District area highlights and what better way to do it than touring in a powerful Porsche!

Porsche at CarsingtonThe soft purr of the 6 cylinder engine as we gently ease out of the farm yard followed by the deep throated roar as we accelerate down the drive – what a sound! Vroom and we are off in our Peak Performance Hire Porsche Boxster for an exciting tour of the scenic Peak District countryside.

Smoothly winding up the snaking hills, the top down, wind blowing through our hair, the feeling of freedom is exhilarating.The silver grey Porsche blended into the misty grey clouds as we approached Dovedale and drove down to Ilam village.

Porsche car

Ilam

Arriving at Ilam Park we didn’t have time to stop for long, but it is worth exploring the ancient semi-natural woodland — Hinkley Wood — designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), noted for its small-leaved and large-leaved limes. You can pack a picnic or there is an excellent tea room and you can leave the car and take a walk along the valley to the famous Stepping Stones at Dovedale.Ilam Our Porsche tour continues with slick speed it’s not long before we reach the picturesque village of Hartington.

Hartington Youth HostelThis magnificent 17th Century manor house, complete with oak paneling and enormous fire places is now an amazing youth hostel.

In 1745 Bonnie Prince Charlie, also known as The Young Pretender, is reputed to have stayed at Hartington Hall. He would have arrived using horsepower, but not a Porsche!! Having reached Derbyshire the lack of support Charles and his army had expected from English Jacobites forced them to turn back!

Hartington villageAlthough a dull day we were still able to tour with the top down, especially as the heated seats kept you warm!

Hartington is an iconic traditional Peak District village with stunning stone buildings and a duck pond.  Famous for its cheese production Hartington offers visitors the chance to discover a real taste of the Peak District with many of the shops, pubs and tea rooms serving local foods.We #LoveLocal and stopped off at The Village Stores for a freshly brewed coffee.

Hartington Village StoresHartington village fascinating facts:
  • Cheese, along with oatcakes and ale has been the staple diet of Derbyshire folk for centuries – and not only in the `snap-tins’ of the lead miners! Roman legions carried cheese to supplement them on their long marches across the county two thousand years ago.
  • Later, during the Middle Ages cheese was traded at local markets throughout the county, with Hartington being the first to be granted a Market Charter in 1203 by William De Ferres.
  • Almost every farmhouse in the Peak District would at one time have made it’s own cheese and sold it at the local market. However in 1870’s the Duke of Devonshire founded The Cheese Factory at Hartington. The Cremery was one of the three sources of Stilton, and also produced its own unique Dovedale cheese and others such as Buxton Blue cheese.
  • Whilst a market hasn’t been held for many years Hartington’s past wealth and importance is clearly visible in the form of impressive stone cottages and large houses around the village square. The many ancient roads and trackways that still meet in the village provide some fabulous walking routes.Old Cheese shop Hartington
  • The factory was closed in 2009 after being sold by Dairy Crest, but cheese production was restarted in the parish in 2012 with the traditional Peakland White, Peakland Blue, and Stilton now available from The Old Hartington Cheese Shop in the middle of the village by the duck pond. Plenty of space to pull up and park your Porsche!
  • Did you know  it takes 70 litres of milk to produce a traditional 16lb Stilton cheese? That is an average cows milk production for 2 days!

Hartington CheeseOur Peak District Tour to be continued…

In the meantime why not hire a Porsche from Peak Performance Hire and take your own tour? It’s not as expensive as you think and Liam can suggest suitable Peak District routes.

Felicity

Disabled Access Day 2017 – meet The Bimblers

Disabled Access Day at Hoe Grange Disabled Access Day was initiated in 2015 by Paul Ralph as a day to celebrate good access and create opportunities for people to try something new in an atmosphere of cooperation, safety and fun.

Paul wanted everyone to celebrate Disabled Access Day by highlighting the fantastic access that already existed, and encouraging people to experience new places.

Now in its third year Disabled Access Day is about #YouAndSomewhereNew and continues to highlight the accessibility of places with touch tours, relaxed performances, sensory experiences, and level access. However it’s not all about facilities, one of the most important factors is a warm welcome!

"Reo"

Last year we welcomed Canine Partners and the amazing assistance dog Rio who could help get people dressed, do the washing, fetch the phone and many more every day tasks to help his owner.

This year at Hoe Grange Holidays we were delighted to give a warm welcome to Rob and Bridget, otherwise known as The Bimblers. The Bimblers write an insightful travel and holiday blog for wheelchair users and people with mobility problems.

The Bimblers Rob and Bridget “bimble” around living life in the slow lane, and show how travel is possible, even with a disability.

We love their style and the way they share their experiences making life easy for others; their valuable advice on how to enjoy travel enables everyone to make the most of their holidays.

Disabled Access Day logoFor the first time, Disabled Access Day was actually spread over 3 days, from 10th to 12th March, which meant there was more opportunity for everyone to join in. Disabled Access Day also aims to raise awareness of the importance of sharing disabled access information.

cake for Disabled Access DayNot only were disabled people, their families and friends invited to visit new places and try new activities over the weekend, but they were encouraged to provide helpful feedback to participating venues about their accessibility by writing reviews on Euan’s Guide.

If you haven’t already discovered Euan’s Guide, it’s the disabled access review website & app, launched in 2013 by Euan MacDonald, himself a powerchair user. The website provides disabled access information for venues including attractions, cinemas, sports grounds, places to stay, and everyday places such as the post office and local services. It allows users to share their experiences and review disabled access at places they visit, and is a fantastic resource if you are thinking of going somewhere new, but want to know what it’s like.

If you have stayed with us and haven’t done so already why not write a review of our facilities on Euan’s Guide?

wheelchair friendly loungeFelicity

A taste of the Peak District delivered to your door

As from previous blog posts you know that at Hoe Grange we #LoveLocal and support other local businesses where ever we can. David and I relish discovering local artisan producers so that as our guests you can enjoy all the Peak District has to offer whilst on your holiday.

Why do we #LoveLocal?

#LoveLocal enables our guests to

  • experience the real Peak District traditions, flavours and produce
  • discover artisan producers, who often create unique products
  • save food miles, which reduces your carbon footprint
  • have confidence in field to fork trace-ability – local farmers can tell you how animals are reared and crops are grown and harvested
  • eat seasonal produce which is packed full of flavour as nature intended
  • support local producers, which in turn helps protect our distinctive Peak District landscape
  • boosts the local economy, which helps sustain artisan businesses
Holiday shopping delivered to your door

Our latest #LoveLocal find is Sauced Here – an ethical online shopping service – all the advantages of a supermarket delivery right to your cabin door ready for your self-catering holiday, but all the benefits of locally produced artisan quality goods.

groceries from Sauced HereWee Dram WhiskeyBeef from New Close FarmSauced Here will deliver your groceries in one flexible delivery from carefully selected top purveyors in the area. Luke of Sauced Here has done the hard work sourcing high quality artisan products for you and they have everything covered from the basics such as Bloomers Bakery and Peak District Dairy, to luxury items such as Holdsworth Chocolates and Wee Dram Whiskey.

Cheese from Cow Close FarmWhere a suitable local product is unavailable an alternative is sourced through the network of independent retailers rather than major supermarkets.

Ready Meals
Ready meals
Luke photographing Stella’s ready meals

Everyone deserves to relax and take time out whilst on holiday. If you want to have a break from the kitchen Sauced Here also offers homemade prepared meals, created from locally sourced produce. The meals are delicious and free from artificial preservatives and extra sugar and salt.

Book a delivery slot to your cabin now.

About Sauced Here

The early inspiration for Sauced Here, like all good ideas arose out of need. Luke Osborne went on a self-catering weekend with a group of friends. They booked a cottage in the countryside and organised for an online supermarket delivery for when they arrived.

Luke and friends then spent the next day kicking themselves as they discovered all the amazing shops in the local village and wished they had waited to buy the local produce on offer. The group felt they had missed out due to lack of local knowledge and a need for convenience.

butchers shop

From that day on Luke started to notice how many great local businesses in his home town of Bakewell were closing down and wondered whether they were being passed by for similar reasons. Thus Sauced Here was born, and we are delighted to support this new innovative enterprise.

Sauced Here logo Luke’s ethos fits in beautifully with our own Eco philosophy. Luke’s mission is to source only the best of the local Peak District area – the best being defined by great taste, traceable origins and products created with passion.

So now you can start shopping for your holiday safe in the knowledge that you are helping to care for the stunning Peak District landscape which you enjoy during your stay at Hoe Grange.

Bon Appétit!

Felicity