Category Archives: Goats

Trit trot, meet the new kids on the block!

Trit trot, trit trot… look who’s arrived at Hoe Grange Holidays now!
Back in January we introduced you to our friendly Pygmy goats, Dora and Luna.

Pygmy goatsRecently our little goat herd has expanded somewhat as these two lovely ladies have both had kids. Meet Luna’s adorable twins, Nutmeg and Saffron, and Dora’s cute kid Looby Lou.Baby Pygmy goats

Here at Hoe Grange we are used to the arrival of lambs, but the kid goats were so much smaller when they were born that we were truly amazed and smitten – these cuddly kids have definitely stolen the “cute factor” from our Jack Russel dog Fudge!

Lambs are up on their feet fairly swiftly after being born, but these baby goats were instantly trying their hardest to stand and within minutes were staggering onto their feet.

drawing of baby goatOne of our holiday guests was so captivated by the new arrival that she sketched this fantastic pencil drawing of Looby Lou when she was just 24 hours old! Emma had never drawn a goat before, but as you can see she is very talented. Emma Warlow creates pet portraits, so if you want to see more of her amazing dog and horse pictures and paintings check out her Instagram @ebmw_artist.

Now that the kids are 2 and 3 weeks old they are very entertaining as they don’t just gambol about like lambs, but positively spring and leap from all four feet like Tigger in Winnie The Pooh!

Indeed “Their tops are made out of rubber
Their bottoms are made out of springs!
They’re bouncy, trouncy, flouncy, pouncy
Fun, fun, fun, fun, fun!”

These adorable baby kid goats have already proved popular with guests and love nothing better than a cuddle!

cuddling baby goats10 amazing facts about Pygmy goats
  1. In the wild Pygmy goats prefer leaves to grass which is why we have no begonias left!
  2. Although Pygmy goats are small they produce quite a lot of milk, which is why our babies are growing so fast and have oodles of energy!Kid goat springingWeb
  3. Goats milk is naturally homogenized and is therefore more easily digested than cows milk.
  4. If threatened they stand up on their hind legs to make themselves appear bigger before bowing down and head butting the approaching enemy – which in our case is Fudge the Jack Russel.
  5. They have a lifespan of 10-15 years, so will be with us for quite sometime!
  6. Their horns start growing as soon as they are born – amazingly our little cuties already have tiny stumps at just 2 weeks old.
  7. A baby female is called a Doeling until it is a year old.
  8. Did you know goats can climb trees? At just 2 weeks old our kids are already jumping up the stone steps in the garden.
  9. Research shows that goats can change their accents when they move group or grow up. The only other mammals that do this are Dolphins, Elephants and of course Humans.
  10. No kidding our doelings are the cutest things you could ever see – why not stay at Hoe Grange and meet them?

goats on a photo shoot
Leaping goat Kid goat leapingWeb

#Farm24 – What’s it all about?

What is #Farm24?

#Farm24 is our chance to showcase 24 hours of farming in the UK, from 5am this morning on August 10 until 5am on August 11 2017. By encouraging farmers to share what they are doing throughout the day with a live feed of pictures, videos, Facebook posts and Tweets the British people will have a greater understanding of how much passion and commitment goes into producing the food they eat.

#Farm24

Pleased to report that #farm24 is now trending on Twitter so hopefully our message is getting across! It gives a rare and honest, ‘behind-the-scenes’ insight of what goes into producing British food and a chance to celebrate the achievements of farmers from all sectors of British agriculture.

From our perspective

#Farm24 offers an opportunity to share our story with the wider public and raise awareness of the care and attention we take to raise our beef cattle and sheep and farm our Peak District landscape sustainably, harnessing the latest technology. We have a policy of #loveLocal and are delighted to share our special place with our holiday guests too.

cow
she must be ready to drop her calf?

Here at Hoe Grange Farm we have been taking part in #Farm24 and recording some of the farming activities David has got up to today; from the early morning cockerel alarm clock, to , checking stock, calving a cow, pasture topping and repairing the many dry stone walls. There is always plenty to do and people often forget that maintaining the landscape is as important as caring for the animals.

Tractor pasture toppingFarming has never been considered an easy option; each day is different and you are at the mercy of the weather, seasons and needs of livestock, and the hours are long. Farming is a way of life which shapes the countryside, sustains rural communities and produces essential food for all.

solar panels and hensAt Hoe Grange we also harness the natural resources around us by using renewable technologies, including solar panels that track the sun, and a wind turbine to generate electricity. Modern farming is a business like any other that has to minimise overheads and reduce costs to remain competitive.

Welcome packWhilst farmer David is busy with the animals, farmer’s wife Felicity takes care of the holiday business, cleaning the log cabins and gorgeous glamping pods, baking biscuits, greeting guests and suggesting fabulous local places to visit, not to forget Tweeting along with the outside world! Hopefully everyone goes home with happy memories and a little wiser about modern farming.

Check us out on Twitter #Farm24 to see what we got up to today!

Felicity

Trit trot, here come the goats

Trit trot, trit trot… look who’s arrived at Hoe Grange Holidays! Joining chief guest entertainment officer Fudge the Jack Russel, we would like to introduce you to Luna and Dora the Pygmy goats. These two lovely ladies are definitely not “gruff” goats, but extremely friendly.

High on a Peak District hill stood a lonely goatherd…Lay ee odl lay ee odl lay hee hoo!

pygmy goats on a hillThese miniature goats previously lived in Ashbourne with our niece and nephew, who are now grown up and out to work all day. As goats are such social creatures Suzie and Sam decided it was unfair to leave the goats home alone, so we are delighted to have inherited them.

They will certainly have lots of company here on the farm – the goat pen with their little shelter is next to the horse paddock, where the chickens also scrat about and the dogs Twix, Crunchie and Fudge often pop round to say hello.

Pygmy goats are the diminutive cousin of the standard domestic goat. They are “fun, friendly and easy to keep”, so Suzie and Sam tell us – we will see!

Unlike domestic goats, which are usually kept as utility animals for their milk or their meat, you will be pleased to hear that the Pygmy goat is mainly kept for amusement – we have already had considerable fun – Dora is definitely an explorer and very nimble. She has already escaped by jumping straight over the stable door in one giant leap! We now have a strategically placed hay rack as an obstacle to prevent further break outs. They may be small but they can certainly jump!

pygmy goat at Hoe Grange As these two adorable, adventurous goats were kept in town rather than on a farm they are trained to walk on the lead and love nothing more than a trek up fields.

They are natural climbers and love roaming and leaping about on the rocky outcrops, surveying the Derbyshire hills. Hoe Grange is going to be an ideal home for them.

Dora the explorer checking out her new surroundings

These two nanny goats have taken our eco ethos to heart and already joined the Hoe Grange Holidays Green Team – they are very keen on recycling and have completely stripped the Christmas tree bare – not a pine needle in sight. One down four more to go!  pygmy goats

It’s true they eat anything, but Christmas trees are a real goat’s treat!

As you can see from our goat video our Labrador Twix isn’t yet entirely sure what to make of them!

Here’s an interesting goat fact – The Italian word for goat is capra; as proved by our little video goats are prone to change direction and have a short attention span, so you can see where the word capriccio, which means whimsy, developed. It is from this word that the English language borrowed capricious, meaning apt to change direction on a whim. Dora and Luna have certainly got everyone running round in circles!

You can meet this entertaining pair in person when you stay in one of cosy log cabins or gorgeous glamping pods.

Felicity